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Wednesday
Oct212009

America Now Over 6 Million Jobs Shy of Administration's Projections

Courtesy of the Committee on Ways and Means:

The table below compares the White House's February 2009 projection of the number of jobs that would be created by the 2009 stimulus law (through the end of 2010) with the actual change in state payroll employment through September 2009 (the latest figures available).  According to the data, 49 States and the District of Columbia have lost jobs since stimulus was enacted.  Only North Dakota has seen net job creation following the February 2009 stimulus.  While President Obama claimed the result of his stimulus bill would be the creation of 3.5 million jobs, the Nation has already lost a total of 2.7 million – a difference of 6.2 million jobs. 

To see how stimulus has failed your state, see the table below.

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Reader Comments (39)

Grim figures indeed.

October 22, 2009 at 06:35 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

But what about the "millions" of jobs saved by the stimulus? Never mind that the WH can't provide data, actual jobs or even a reasonable "pulled this one out of my ass" excuse for the figure. The MSM like David Gregory on Meet the Press last Sunday let's that statement go by from Valerie Jarret without challenging its very high bullshit factor.

October 22, 2009 at 07:19 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

Hey, I’ve got an idea!

Instead of incessantly complaining, why don’t both of you grab a mop?

October 22, 2009 at 07:45 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

Winston;

That's one job Obama is qualified for.

October 22, 2009 at 07:49 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

The dems who obviously by there ineptness couldn’t create a job even in a whorehouse, are good at one thing; creating new taxes. From the Washington Times:

Democrats Hidden Gas Tax-$3.6 Trillion

"Americans travel more than 200 million vehicle miles each month, and annually we spend nearly $1.2 trillion on gasoline and oil. The average household spends 5 percent of its annual budget on fuel. For many, gasoline is a mandatory expense. And this legislation disproportionately hits middle and lower income households that tend to have longer commutes to work and must drive in order to work. These families will be hit especially hard by the projected $1 per gallon increase for the additional gas tax the cap-and-trade legislation will bring."

October 22, 2009 at 08:02 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

Despite hating his politics with a passion, I’ve always regarded Patrick Ruffini as one of the young Right’s brighter lights. Sure enough, here he grudgingly acknowledges the Democratic left is proving itself a hell of a lot more effective at holding its President’s feet to the fire than the Bush toadies we called the GOP ever were.

I’ve some quibbles—what Ruffini terms “the left blogosphere” is no more or less than just the party’s Democratic wing—blogs being now just our communications arteries—and I think he’s quite wrong about both the substance of the public option (it’s good policy and it’s ALREADY a “compromise” as Ruffini’s first commenter points out) and about whether getting it passed will hurt the party with voters (on the contrary).

In fact, I’m quite sure any reform that doesn’t include public option will wind up being roundly unpopular as a burdensome mandate and a giveaway to the insurers that lacks any mechanism for real cost control. But on the process, Ruffini has nailed it. the Right could learn a lot from the base/leadership dynamics on display here. Although whether the Right is simply too authoritarian and blindly worshipful of authority to EVER hold its leaders to account in this way is probably a separate question. Oh, yes. they grumble, it's what they're good at, but not to any great effect.

Meanwhile, surprise, surprise! Thomas declines to pick up a mop. The Caucus of Incessant Complainers looks less attractive every day. "Who messed this bed? What a terrible smell! Quick, somebody do something!"

October 22, 2009 at 08:48 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

Winston;

My mop is bigger than yours and it's called my income tax bill.

As for job creation, who has time for job creation when brillant lights like this who surely have the ear of the demwits in Congress:

"At Guantanamo, the U.S. government turned a jukebox into an instrument of torture," said Thomas Blanton, executive director of the archive, an independent, nongovernmental research institute."

October 22, 2009 at 09:08 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

I think some people are far too vague in describing their meaning of a public option. It's like saying "I play a lot of sports", when actually all I play is soccer and the occasional football pick-up game. It's impossible to know what their meaning is because they never tell us... it's just become a talking point that they hope will get picked up by clueless people who have no idea what it is either, but know they need it because the Democrats told them they do.

October 22, 2009 at 09:57 | Unregistered CommenterSDiA

My mop is bigger than yours and it's called my income tax bill.

. . . . and you know this how, exactly?

October 22, 2009 at 10:09 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

Current economic policy is not conducive to job creation.

October 22, 2009 at 10:40 | Registered CommenterGrayRider

Bullwinkle Moose, "Watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat!"
Well, if you remember, it was never a rabbit that came out of that hat.
Anyone else see Krugman on Sunday remark about the 'mystery forces' that prevent a robust recovery? Seems the government is throwing everything including the kitchen sink ($5M SBA loans, 10% payroll tax deduction, etc) and it's not working.
Kinda reminds me of the chicken farmer who spreads the corn with one hand and has an axe behind his back in the other.

October 22, 2009 at 10:42 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

any reform that doesn’t include public option will wind up being roundly unpopular

You buy into those polls that give an advantage to the liberal viewpoint. How convenient.
If only the rest of us would just shut up and do what we're told, it would stand a chance.

October 22, 2009 at 11:03 | Unregistered CommenterSDiA

Last I checked we've seen no great accomplishments with a majority in all houses, and we're being told it's the Republicans that won't clean up the mess? Unbelievable. What's it take for you to see that your party is doing little or nothing to improve things? They're too wrapped up in their own health care agenda to see the country past that. Too busy with that to make a decision on troop levels in the "good war". Maybe they're just too distracted by Fox News, or fancy White house dinner parties, or the Chamber of Commerce. It's ard to get things done when you're letting your emotions get in the way of your decisiveness.

Maybe if they just throw some more money out the door, that will get things working again. How are those bank loans coming along? How's the car companies doing these days? How about them jobs? Change? Hope? Nothing?


(Only 1111 days until the next Presidential election)

October 22, 2009 at 11:37 | Unregistered CommenterBEEFCAKE

Well, Beefcake, TARP was a Republican thing, pushed by the previous Administration.

I'm with you on the bailout of GM; I still hold some hope for a recovery of sorts (even in a much smaller form), but that shouldn't have been the government's call to make.

I'd also agree that large chunks of the stimulus package were wasted; I mean, there's a chain of cosmetology schools in Kentucky that drew stimulus funding...which is utterly ridiculous. I'd also point out, however, that they've only actually spent about 1/3 of the funds appropriated in the Act.

October 22, 2009 at 12:31 | Registered Commenterwesmorgan1

Hey, Skinny, any chance of knowing which statistics the Republicans used for their counting? Their link to "state payroll employment" just goes to the BLS statistics page, which offers a gazillion database/search options; there's no indication of which set of numbers they used for their table.

While we're at it, I don't think it quite accurate to compare projections for December 2010 to September 2009, just to get a nice and scary "6 million jobs" figure. Again, they've only actually spent about 1/3 of the stimulus monies; the better comparison would be to go state by state and compare how much of their stimulus monies they've received to whether or not the state seems to reaching a "stop the bleeding" point. In some cases (California comes to mind), things still won't look that good, but I suspect that the story will be different for smaller state economies.

October 22, 2009 at 12:50 | Registered Commenterwesmorgan1

Democrats controlled Congress so TARP was written and voted for by them, or is someone going to claim that GW Bush was able to write a bill and pass it into law without Congress? Half of you don't even think GW Bush could read or write so its really a bad stretch of your rhetoric to claim he wrote TARP. Its amazing how everything is Bush's fault to these people.
Lets remind the voters that it was the conservatives in the House who actually defeated TARP in its first vote (before the Senate usurped a medical bill so that by the time it got back to the House, it would be via the Conference Committee framework, so House members were lockedout of changing the bill the Senate wrote)

As they say, You are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts.

October 22, 2009 at 13:38 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

U3 vs U6
lol

October 22, 2009 at 13:54 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

griswold, all I'm saying is that they're all at fault. TARP was too much, the stimulus was poorly designed in several aspects, and the bailouts of AIG and GM were just plain goofy.

There's a chunk that is "Bush's fault," and there's a chunk that is "Obama's fault," but I happen to think that the largest chunk is "Congress' fault," and I mean that in an institutional sense, not a one-party-or-the-other sense.

If you want to get really picky, it's true that many Republicans voted against TARP, but 34 Senate GOPers and 93 House GOPers voted for it, including the Minority Leader - and I certainly don't recall any serious filibuster effort. (Only 15 GOP Senators voted against it)

October 22, 2009 at 14:04 | Registered Commenterwesmorgan1

You really want to know who's fault it is?
It's our fault.
Somewhere along the line, the voters believed the 'Big Lie' that the government can fix 'it'.
The U.S. began the abandonment of its system of free market capitalism at the end of the Calvin Coolidge administration. We now firmly reside in a system known as Corporatism, and have for decades, in which special interest groups have captured the state. The only "change" (hah!) is when the out party becomes the in party and brings its own constituencies.
I get more and more depressed at the arguments from the 'arrested development crowd' that lacks the historical and non technical knowledge for the situation we've put ourselves in these many years. The 'middle class' will be destroyed by themselves. Somewhere along the line the middle class stopped taking education seriously, stopped saving money, stopped worrying about irresponsible levels of debt, and stopped enlisting. The new middle class focus is all about politics...the civil redistribution of wealth and replacement of private capital with public debt; new age media...the preocuppation with digital noise and celebrity as a high speed replacement for cultural depth; and lots of food lest we forget. In truth, our middle class is bigger and wealthier than any class in history. The problem is we are Filline's "Los vitallones"...read fatted calves.

October 22, 2009 at 14:36 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

"
My mop is bigger than yours and it's called my income tax bill.

. . . . and you know this how, exactly?"

My experience with people who always blame " the rich, Conservatives, Republicans, Neocons, Rush Limbaugh, Hannity, Glen Beck. George Bush, Dick Cheney, Scooter Libby, Sarah Palin and all white people as racist but believe government will fix there personal ills", don't either achieve much in life or become that monetarily successful. Just an observation.

October 22, 2009 at 14:53 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

Somewhere along the line the middle class stopped taking education seriously, stopped saving money, stopped worrying about irresponsible levels of debt, and stopped enlisting. The new middle class focus is all about politics...the civil redistribution of wealth and replacement of private capital with public debt; new age media...the preocuppation with digital noise and celebrity as a high speed replacement for cultural depth; and lots of food lest we forget. In truth, our middle class is bigger and wealthier than any class in history. The problem is we are Filline's "Los vitallones"...read fatted calves.
On this, we are in near-total agreement.

October 22, 2009 at 15:38 | Registered Commenterwesmorgan1

"My experience with people who always blame " the rich, Conservatives, Republicans, Neocons, Rush Limbaugh, Hannity, Glen Beck. George Bush, Dick Cheney, Scooter Libby, Sarah Palin and all white people as racist but believe government will fix there personal ills", don't either achieve much in life or become that monetarily successful. Just an observation"

Bill Gates and Warren Buffet sure blow that theory all to hell don't they? Ofcourse nobody knew who the fuck Sarah Palin and Glen Beck were this time last year, so your experience isn't so much based in reality is it?

Another example of condescending conservative babble. Ever notice when the topic of how wealthy the people are in Congress, conservatives complain and whine about how the Democrats are richer? Ever notice how the Democratic leaning states all tend to have higher average incomes? Yeah, its cause all those conservatives are such hard working rich people.

October 22, 2009 at 16:20 | Unregistered CommenterkwAwk

kwawk is exhibit 'A"
Shows up and proves my point.

October 22, 2009 at 16:56 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

Yeah, kwAwk is a great example given that he is a college educated man who enlisted for 6 years in the Marine Reserves, has no debt outside of his student loans and a small car loan, believes that we need to raise taxes to pay down the debt and eliminate the deficit and doesn't watch TV or get into 'celebrity' type stuff.

Aside from that you hit the nail on the head though. Bravo.

Oh and I'm also interested in history too. Enough to know that the end of the Coolige adminstration was the beginning of the Hoover administration. Hoover you might be interested to know was very much a radical free market kind of guy, who because of his free market principles oversaw the collapse of the US economy and allowed so much of the economy to be eviscerated that it took almost 15 years for the country to recover. You'll remember Archie Bunker singing, 'Mister we could use a many like Herbert Hoover again..."

Ofcourse referencing the end of the Coolige administration as the point that America went wrong is certainly signalling something, and ofcourse that signal is political. It is the reference to FDR and the New Deal. It is a political signal that everything you believe is wrong with this country is the fault of the left. It is a way of whining about how political everybody else is while claiming to be apolitical yourself. Its kinda Limbaugh slick.

October 22, 2009 at 17:46 | Unregistered CommenterkwAwk

You buy into those polls that give an advantage to the liberal viewpoint. How convenient.

Skinny, if you actually buy into the notion that the public option is not really supported by a very substantial majority of Americans, well, I’ll just be polite and say you seriously disappoint me, I thought you were smarter than that. Digby has a good line on this: “They assume that the whole country is bat sh*t crazy when only a portion of it is.”

About Tom's rant, the less said the better. Truth is he has no idea whatsoever how successful any poster is on this board, financially or otherwise, but he'll never let that stop him from talking the most preposterous smack.

October 22, 2009 at 18:12 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

KwAwk;

That's funny, I've never seen Gates or Buffet blame others for any misfortune they may have come across but you sure do. Read a few of there books, you might be surprised that neither have much use for people who whine on how life has dealt them a shit sandwich.

October 22, 2009 at 20:06 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

In an era where the term SWAG is now looked upon as economic science compared to Obama's "pulled that number out of my ass" type of pontifications (millions of jobs saved, pass this stimulus and for sure unemployment will stay under 8.5%, this budget is balanced), no wonder his poll numbers are cratering like the outdoor temps. LOL. 10 months and people are already sick of this guy. Sweet Jesus wait until 2011.

October 22, 2009 at 20:17 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

Really TM? When have I ever blamed anybody for any misfortune I've had in life? Please do point this out or shut up.

And seriously TM you are the one who should read more. Both Gates and Buffet have both said that they believe taxes in this country are too low on people as wealthy as they are.

And yes TM, people on right wing radio and Foxnews are very tired of the Obama administration. People in the real world? Not so much. You're so full of shit you leave a trail of feces everywhere you go.

October 22, 2009 at 20:51 | Unregistered CommenterkwAwk

Winston, you and the rest of the left continuously tout this notion of a public option, without ever coming up with a clear definition of what exactly you mean by adding a public option. Right now, we have various forms of public options in health care. What people fear is what they haven't been told and what hasn't been clarified. More and more people are dependent upon reading between the lines, as opposed to hearing the facts from the politicians' mouths.

Please... define the Democrats plan for a public option.... THEN ask for peoples' opinions. It's rather hard to judge what ones feelings are on something they know nothing about. In essence, the public option is just a fantasy the Dems are throwing around in speeches, as if it's something we can't live without. It comes with a magic wand and pixie dust... and it's brought to you thanks to Uncle Sam's deep pockets filled with ObamaMoney.

My father is on a public option... he's a Vet. Blown out of a cab of an excavator while digging trenches in Vietnam as a Navy Seabea. He goes to a VA hospital in Iowa City almost every month now so they can check his diabetes. That is one form of a public option. My grandma was on medicaid. She died after years of smoking 6 packs a day... Camel non-filtesr, or whatever other brand of non-filter was on sale. They treated her for everything, and not once did she show signs of lungs problems. She eventually, but it had more to do with her brain than it did her lungs. She was able to seek treatment up until the end thanks to the public option she was on, a retired old lady who didn't need to sell her home over her health care bills. Millions of children across the US get health care under a government plan... they too are on a public option. Do you actually hear Republicans spouting out against such care?

My question for you is... WHAT is this public option you keep saying we can't live without, that is detrimental to the health care bill. I hear Maddow say it, and Ed Schultz is yapping his fat face about it right now as I'm typing... but I'll be damned if they haven't given us any detail of what it would do for the uninsured in the country. In its current state, it is not a plan, it is only rhetoric... how can anybody approve or disapprove of something that doesn't exist... let alone consider it to be popular or unpopular.

It'shard to be popular when you're never there to being with.

October 23, 2009 at 03:10 | Registered Commenterskinnydipinacid

no wonder his poll numbers are cratering like the outdoor temps. LOL. 10 months and people are already sick of this guy.

Tom, are you an Alabaman?

Ed Schultz, like Michael Moore and Al Gore, is . . . fat.

October 23, 2009 at 05:38 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

kwAwk;

Your right, we love Obama. We really do. LOL.

Gallop-

"Barack Obama sees worst poll rating drop in 50 years
The decline in Barack Obama's popularity since July has been the steepest of any president at the same stage of his first term for more than 50 years."

As for Gates & Buffet wanting higher taxes, that's great for billionaires but it never stays at billionaires because that's not where the money is at for real revenue. It's in the middle to upper class. You know the ones that already shoulder over 90% of the taxes already? So my reply to Gates & Buffet on taxes is STFU. And BTW, Buffet sure does a nice job of taking every tax credit, relief, offset and deferred tax he can for a supposed tax liberal who proposes higher taxes. A cynical person might say Warren is full of shit, I mean feces on this subject.

October 23, 2009 at 07:38 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

Actually, skinny dip, since you wrote all that down, you really deserve a better answer than I gave you.

Public option? It’s no big mystery. It’s having the choice of enrolling in government-sponsored medical coverage, period. You may need this if the private carriers deny you or completely price you out of coverage. Is it like your father’s VA coverage? Yes. Is it like your grandmother’s Medicaid (or Medicare)? Yes. Is it like kids’ S-CHIP coverage? Yes, it’s like all of these. They work pretty well for your dad and your Grandma and the kids—as you yourself acknowledge.

Do you actually hear Republicans spouting out against such care?

Come on, you can’t be serious, skinny! Like all social welfare legislation, Republicans bitterly opposed creating these programs. They fulminate against them constantly, and still scheme over ways to put an end to them once and for all. Don't be disingenuous about this. To the extent Republicans hide or downplay their antipathy to these programs (and mostly they don't even try), it's only because they appreciate how popular the programs are and how unpopular their position is.

if you don’t [oppose King-Anderson, Medicare’s predecessor legislation] and if I don’t do it, one of these days you and I are going to spend our sunset years telling our children, and our children’s children, what it once was like in America when men were free.

we don't get rid of it [traditional Medicare] in round one because we don't think that that's politically smart and we don't think that that's the right way to go through a transition. But we believe it's going to wither on the vine because we think people are voluntarily going to leave it -- voluntarily."

Whether it’s because they’re a wholly-owned subsidiary of a fantastically profitable yet socially useless industry, or they’re just blinded by free-market ideology, what the No Party refuses to face is that whatever the successes and achievements of the free market—and they are many and very considerable—affordable health coverage for all is not among them. The public does not buy their idiotic mantra that the real problem is that people have too much insurance as it is. When people aren’t locked anymore into their jobs for fear of lost coverage, entrepreneurship will get an enormous boost.

Regular families understand that, even with industry lackeys and their ever-willing-tools in the lunatic fringe doing their best to terrify and confuse them. Ed Shultz’s weight problem notwithstanding.

October 23, 2009 at 08:59 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

Tom continues his retreat into a hermetic, self-constructed reality where we’ve got a discredited and widely hated President, Al Franken stole his Senate seat, Michael Moore releases one flop after another, tax cuts are free, and they found the WMD.

Buffet sure does a nice job of taking every tax credit, relief, offset and deferred tax he can for a supposed tax liberal . . . A cynical person might say Warren is full of s***

Oh, man. Gotta love that logic. As if no one has any business advocating fairer tax policies unless they’re willing to give the government more money than they legally have to. Now a cynical person might think Tom can’t even really buy this nonsense himself. But I’m not a cynical person; I just think Tom lost all his old college textbooks.

I'm very much looking forward to 2020 and Tom's predictions of the imminent Republican comeback.

October 23, 2009 at 09:25 | Unregistered CommenterWinston

According to Mike Allen at Politico, Pelosi lacks the 218 votes to pass healthcare with the public option in the house! We already saw that Reid came up a mere 13 votes short for the Senate to hid under the carpet $250 billion a year in payments to doctors that will blow the budget out even worse than it already is under Obama. And this vote had nothing to do with the public option!

So by all means lefties, dream on about the public option. Or do the political suicide route and pass healthcare via reconciliation. Americans would really respect that process. I mean Obama’s economic policies are working so well for dems in the Virginia and NJ races right now, why not?

October 23, 2009 at 09:33 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

It's always Libs that want others to pay higher taxes. As I've mentioned in the past, there are no bigger complainer’s screamers and scammers to relieve themselves of higher taxes than Hollywood liberals. Who threatens to move production out of Hollywood for better tax climates? It's the Hollywood studios and money men. Yes the same people who complain that others don't pay there fair share but work side deals with the politicians for tax relief. I don’t blame them but there hypocrisy is unbelievable. So please, the next time you see Ted Danson and his moralizing for 'higher taxes on the rich' plea, know this guy is full of shit.

October 23, 2009 at 09:44 | Unregistered CommenterThomas Miller

"...pass healthcare via reconciliation."

They're scared to... hence the reason for Harry Reid's continuous backpeddling...
(speaking of the soon-to-be former Nevada Senator, I wonder if he and Nancy are at odds?)

...if they find that they have no choice but to try passing it through reconciliation,
they'd be signing their own death certificates, so they'd likely wait until after an election.

Perhaps Harry Reid is actually the only Democrat kinda-smart enough to realize that.

October 23, 2009 at 10:22 | Registered Commenterskinnydipinacid

"Hoover you might be interested to know was very much a radical free market kind of guy, who because of his free market principles oversaw the collapse of the US economy and allowed so much of the economy to be eviscerated that it took almost 15 years for the country to recover. "

Are you serious? You actually are completely unaware of Hoovers Interventionist Policies? (Hoover's Attack on Laissez-Faire) History as propaganda.
It's not that you know so much, it's that so much of what you know is wrong.
I'm not so much interested in a political party point of view, I'm interested in rational debates for solutions. Unfortunately, the American Citizen ceded all their options to the government instead of figuring out ways to be self sufficient. We are not willing to admit that we live in a welfare state that has become unsustainable. Maybe this 'death spiral of the welfare state' as Robert Samuelson calls it, IS the reset we need. I can't imagine Americans living with the 'new normal' it would make me too sad.

October 23, 2009 at 10:46 | Unregistered Commentergriswold3

Really? That's a great thing but can't acceptable due to knowing current economic policy. As for job creation, there will be the blessing for new comers.

November 7, 2009 at 01:32 | Unregistered Commenteradaptateur

It is a table that shows some hard facts, it shows how deep into recession we are now and to the positive side it shows that this will be over by 2010 and will provide job opportunities by then. Hope that this table remains true and people are employed again by the next year.
keyboards

November 17, 2009 at 04:20 | Unregistered Commenterjustin

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